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KAI Special… Awarding Winning Author, Cynthia Reyes!

Kev’s Author Interviews Presents…

A KAI Special with Award Winning Author:

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Cynthia Reyes!

Earlier, I asked Cynthia to tell us a bit about herself:
CR: I was born and raised in the countryside of Jamaica. Came to Canada on 2 weeks’ notice and truly grew up here. It’s where I became a strong and caring daughter, wife and mother.
I’m thankful for my partnership with my husband and close relatives in raising our two strong, gifted and kind daughters.
I’m also grateful for a successful career in television and in project consulting. I was an executive producer, leader and trainer at Canada’s largest television network, and have worked as a consultant on large projects.

Kev: Welcome to this special edition of KAI, Cynthia. Tell us a little about your book and how did you come up with the title?
51COr80Z3tL._SX322_BO1,204,203,200_CR: Thank you, Kev.
The title? There are several clues in the book, and I’ll share the two most obvious ones:
Our Victorian farmhouse and furnishings are, unlike some Victorian homes, unpretentious. The measurements are “true”, the building materials and construction are solid.
This house is also where I faced some hard truths — and some consoling truths — during the decade after a car accident damaged my life and that of my family.
Kev: Which Genre(s) do you have it listed under?
CR: Memoir; Literary Non-Fiction
Kev: Could you provide us a bit more detail about your book?
CR: For a book that reveals hard truths, An Honest House is surprisingly comforting, joyful and downright hilarious at times.
I’m dealing with PTSD, mental confusion, great pain, nightmares, and depression. But I find beauty in the garden, wisdom in my growing relationship with the house, my family, friends, neighbours, church community and God. And laughter – I learn to laugh again.
The book is full of fascinating characters; some you meet in hilarious situations, most in acts of love and courage that are helping to pull me through the terrible times.
Kev: What parts of your book are you most proud of and why?
CR: The parts that immerse the reader in PTSD episodes. Why? Because in order to do that, I had to re-immerse myself in those experiences and that was truly terrifying. I walked away from the manuscript 3 times and vowed I’d never return. Took me nearly 3 years, but I finally got it done.
Kev: Provide a teaser/short passage from your book.
CR: This is how the book opens:
“Ambercroft Farm,” the sign out front said.
Hamlin was on a first-name basis with the grand old farmhouse right from the start, calling it Ambercroft. For years, I didn’t call it anything at all.
The tall, two-storey Victorian house on the northern edge of Toronto seemed sealed off from the rest of the neighbourhood. Within a solid wooden fence and gates, massive maples waved big leafy arms. Pines and dense blue-green spruces soared. A cedar hedge ran the length of the property on one side.
This was a private place, sure of its personality and power.

***

Kev: When you wrote this work, did you write off-the-cuff or use some kind of formula like an outline?
CR: The fact that I’m following the timeline of my life over a period of 3 years (with some flashbacks) perhaps makes it easier to plot the journey of the story than if this were a work of fiction.
Almost all the raw material came from my journals, letters and notebooks. Some of my journal entries became blog posts, which means they were already transformed into a narrative with a beginning, middle and end. Some became magazine stories (short memoirs).
So I look at all the journal entries, blog posts and magazine stories from that 3-year period and create a book outline with a beginning, middle and end. Then I start writing to create that first draft.
I suppose I do think in stories, because even when the journal entries are just a series of bullet-points, I can see the story those bullet points are trying to tell. And almost every chapter of my books tells a story that helps develop the overall story.
In subsequent drafts, I work at the language. I want readers to experience everything I experience, so I use vivid, emotive, simple language. (I avoid what I call ‘the big expensive words”.) I also use the five senses to describe settings in particular.
Sometimes, I leave my desk and actually go to look at the face of a daffodil in the garden, or the wood floor or harvest table in my house, just to see the way the light falls on it. I’ll make notes. Then I’ll come back and add it to the manuscript.
Kev: What challenges did this particular work pose for you?
CR: Writing is a pain – literally. My body hurts. Trying to cross-reference material and keep track of details gives me enormous headaches – a result of the head injury.
Writing about PTSD, mental confusion, not being able to do the things I used to – that’s emotional pain. But writing for me has also been an instrument of grace. So I dread the pain of doing it, but I hope that – Deo volente — I will be able to keep doing it.
Kev: What methods are you using to promote this work?
CR: Probably not enough!
My Blog, Facebook, News releases to libraries, book clubs, organizations, etc., etc. Word-of-mouth via readers of the first book (A Good Home); friends; an Ad in the magazine I write for; stories in newspapers, etc.
Kev: Do you have any advice for new authors?
CR: Read a lot. Write a lot. Always carry a notebook with you. Daily life is a fountain of ideas, as are special events. I even make notes at funerals, but please don’t tell anyone that!
Finally, you need someone to read your work, but be careful who you share your first work with; most people don’t really know how to critique a book and may unintentionally discourage you.
Kev: Your book recently won, The Diamond Book Award for 2016. What was your experience like, and how much does this mean to you?
a2e59a0b-f779-418f-906c-301ad2d14b7aCR: It means a lot. I know that the standards for this award are high, and I respect the founder of it, so that all adds up to a big deal to me.
I won awards for my network TV programs, my work in journalism, and as a trainer and program developer in the television industry. I also won awards for community service. But it never occurred to me that I’d win an award for work done after the accident, because I lost my career, skills and confidence.
It’s still amazing to me that people like my books and read them over and over. So it’s ten times more incredible that one of my books has won an award, especially the book that caused me such pain. The Diamond Book Award is a huge boost.
Thank you, Kevin.

Here’s the Link to Cynthia’s celebration post for The Diamond Book Awards:

2016 Diamond Book Awards Winner

Here’s the link to Cynthia’s Blog: https://cynthiasreyes.com/

And finally, the links to Cynthia’s book: AmazonCA/AmazonUS/AmazonUK

Let’s hear it for Cynthia Reyes, everyone!

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About Kev

Kev is an Author & Songwriter. After years of studying, and even more years working in education, and management in the US, he returned to his hometown in England where he finally settled down to focus on his writing and music. Links to his works can be found in the widget bar, and more information about them can be found on his pages above. He would greatly appreciate it if you would check them out. Kev has a M.Ed in Secondary Education with English as his main subject area. He also did post-graduate studies in Christian Counselling and Psychopathology after obtaining a BA in Psychology with a minor in Classical Greek.

58 comments on “KAI Special… Awarding Winning Author, Cynthia Reyes!

  1. This was a wonderful review of Cynthia’s book – I particularly liked learning the details of her writing process and her use of the 5 senses – so important to bringing life to a piece.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Fantastic review with Cynthia. I loved learning more about her and her writing. She is after all a fellow Canadian author from my neck of the woods. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Both of Cynthia’s memoirs are wonderful and thoroughly deserve to be recognised, it’s always a pleasure to learn more about how they came into being.

    Liked by 2 people

  4. Great interview, great author, wonderful books!! Such a pleasure getting to know Cynthia and an inspiration to anyone facing life struggles! Tina

    Liked by 2 people

  5. Excellent interview, Kev and Cynthia. It makes me want to go back and reread both books. Thank you for the added insights behind the pages of the memoir.
    Blessings ~ Wendy

    Like

  6. I have loved both of Cynthia’s books and I admire her so much for her courage and honesty. Thank-you for this interesting interview Kev and it’s nice to meet you!

    Like

  7. Very Nice feature…. I love Cynthia’s writing… Best of luck. Aquileana ❤️

    Like

  8. Congratulations Cynthia. This is a lovely, honest interview.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Cynthia Reyes is a fascinating woman, which makes this an illuminating interview. ❤ 🙂
    Congratulations, Cynthia and thank you both.

    Like

  10. A great interview with Cynthia, Kevin! I learned more about Cynthia and what she went through to get these two outstanding books written and published. She is a truly remarkable person, and one of Canada’s treasures.

    Like

  11. Reblogged this on Cynthia Reyes – Author of "A Good Home" & "An Honest House" and commented:
    Just in case you are not ENTIRELY bored of reading about why and how I write — and a few other things — I am reblogging the interview done very recently by the wonderful Kev Cooper:

    Like

    • I can’t believe this ended up in my spam folder; what on earth is wordpress up to?! Anyway, rescued without so much ado. You’re getting great responses, Cynthia… very well done! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Thank you, Kev, for kindly interviewing me, making it easy for me to answer your questions without any pressure, and featuring me on your blog. As both an author and as a person (’cause authors aren’t persons, right?), it’s a real privilege for me.

    Liked by 2 people

  13. It is nice to meet Cynthia, Her book sounds like a remarkable journey through emotion, pain and suffering. I wish her well in her continuing journey. Thank you, Kev, for this wonderful interview of this amazing author. Blessings & hugs to you both. I will check out her book soon. My TBR list is bursting at the seams! 😘

    Liked by 2 people

  14. Reblogged this on Smorgasbord – Variety is the spice of life and commented:
    Kevin Cooper with a delightful interview with Cynthia Reyes about her life and writing.. head over and check it out.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Brilliant interview Kev and congratulations to Cynthia. Cynthia sounds really amazing. I love memoirs, so I definitely will be checking Cynthia’s books out. 🙂

    Like

  16. Enjoyed seeing this side of Cynthia, too. It was only a few months ago that I bumped into her blog and I most definitely want to read the book. I have read the ‘look inside’ portion available on Amazon, and I highly recommend that too!
     
    Thanks for sharing, Kev, and congratulations Cynthia! All the best in your journey.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. Interesting interview. Based on what she says about the content of the book and how much of it is based on her letters, journals and so on, I’m not surprised it turned out to be such an affecting read and won the award

    Liked by 2 people

  18. Great interview. Yet another perspective of Cynthia.

    While Cynthia is proudest of the parts about PTSD, and I can see why, because that’s personal; what I liked were the observational parts of the book about other people, the emotive parts. That’s where her journalistic skills shone for me.

    Totally empathise with this interview, and yes, to all authors, be careful who you share with.

    Finally, the comment about language. That’s key. Excellent point.

    Some good lessons here.

    Liked by 2 people

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